Thursday, June 30, 2016

KIMONO COAT

Early last century, influences from the Orient influenced art and fashion.
Paul Poiret and Mariano Fortuny were the two designers who have brought more fabrics and designs inspired by the Rising Sun in fashion. Paul Poiret became famous with his controversial kimono coat and similar, loose-fitting designs created specifically for an uncorseted, slim figure. His designs were exotic; the Russian ballet, Orientalism, and African art, as interpreted by the cubists, were typical influences. Paul Poiret called this item a "kimono coat." The pieces constructed the coat were cut straight. East Asia, for him, was an extremely ambiguous concept, as it was for many contemporary Westerners and differences between Japanese garments, and even between Japan and China, were obscure. Kimono consisted of a natural drape of lithe cloth flowing down from the shoulders enveloping the body.
Mariano Fortuny also closely studied kimono, influenced by his father, a Spanish painter who was immersed in Japan art in Paris, he became familiar with kimono from his childhood. The influence of kimono can be seen in many aspects of Fortuny's clothing, including the composition of placing a supporting point on the shoulders, and the citing of patterns.
From then to now designers like McQueen, Galliano, Sarah Burton, continue to revisit the classic oriental kimono.
colori e altri materiali prese in giro qua e là....



CLOSET CASTLE di Annapaola Brancia d'Apricena


Renewed findings from the coffer of a castle

90's kimono coat

Alexander McQueen -Vogue 2009

Dior by Galliano 2007

Eleonora Duse

Olga De Meyer photo by Adolf De Meyer

Evening Coat by Paul Poiret

Coat by Paul Poiret

Coat by Paul Poiret


Coat by Paul Poiret

Coat by Paul Poiret

Coat by Mariano Fortuny
Related Article:http://www.scostumista.com/2016/07/the-cherry-orchard.html

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